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This week [May 6 - 13, 2018] in avant garde cinema

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This page is updated every Sunday.
  • Monday, May 7, 2018
  • Tuesday, May 8, 2018
  • Wednesday, May 9, 2018
  • Thursday, May 10, 2018
  • Friday, May 11, 2018
  • Saturday, May 12, 2018
  • Sunday, May 13, 2018
  • This week's programs (summary):

    Monday, May 7, 2018
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    Los Angeles, California: Human Resources
    8 PM, 410 Cottage Home St
    I Knew That Was You
    Nicolas Bermeo and Keijaun Thomas would like to cordially invite you to their first two person show, ‘I Knew That Was You’ at Human Resources (HRLA) on Monday, May 7th from 8-10pm. They will be screening two video works: Greetings From Here: Audio Postcards in Transition by Pauline Gloss with visuals by Nicolas Bermeo ( 30 mins) & HEAT, by Nicolas Bermeo ( 10 mins) and presenting a special performance iteration of My Last American Dollar: Round 1. Tricking and Flipping Coins: Making Dollars Hit, Round 2. Black Angels in the Infield: Dripping Faggot Sweat, Round 3. Whatchu Gonna Do: Marvelous like Marva (60 minutes)

    New York, NY: Anthology Film Archives
    7:15 PM, 32 Second Avenue
    EC: SONGS 1-14
    by Stan Brakhage. "SONG 1: Portrait of a lady. SONGS 2 & 3: Fire and a mind's movement in remembering. SONG 4: Three girls playing with a ball. Hand painted. SONG 5: A childbirth song. SONG 6: The painted veil via moth-death. SONG 7: San Francisco. SONG 8: Sea creatures. SONG 9: Wedding source and substance. SONG 10: Sitting around. SONG 11: Fires, windows, an insect, a lyre of rain scratches. SONG 12: Verticals and shadows caught in glass traps. SONG 13: A travel song of scenes and horizontals. SONG 14: Molds, paints and crystals." -Stan Brakhage

    New York, NY: Anthology Film Archives
    8:45 PM, 32 Second Avenue
    EC: SONGS 15-22
    by Stan Brakhage. "SONG 15: FIFTEEN SONG TRAITS: A series of individual portraits of friends and family - Robert Creeley, Michael McClure, Ed Dorn, Jonas Mekas, others. SONG 16: A flowering of sex as in the mind's eye, a joy. SONGS 17 & 18: The movie house cathedral and a singular room. SONGS 19 & 20: Women dancing and a light. SONGS 21 & 22: Two views of closed-eye vision." -Stan Brakhage

    New York, New York: SLIPPER ROOM
    8 PM, 167 Orchard ST-entrance on Stanton STREEET
    ATTACK OF THE SLIPPER ROOM MOVIE MONDAYS
    with Lili White's short films, SHE DREAMS the WORLD and TRIPTYCH and Coleen Fitzgibbon’s feature film on East Village artist Jonathan Silver: Infidel in the Studio

    Tuesday, May 8, 2018
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    Brooklyn, NY: Light Industry
    7:30 PM EDT, 155 Freeman Street
    From the Collection of Pearl Bowser
    Curated by Ina Archer A pillar of film culture since the 1960s, Pearl Bowser has supported and promoted African American cinema through a wide variety of roles-programmer, distributor, producer, director, historian, educator. Beginning in the early 70s, her research into the work of Oscar Micheaux and other pioneering black directors proved instrumental in reviving interest in the all-but-forgotten "race films" of the silent and early sound era; as a key element of this decades-long project, Bowser sought out and rescued many of the surviving prints of work by Micheaux and other auteurs, laying the groundwork for later scholarship and preservation efforts. Out of this project, she would eventually produce several books on Micheaux as well as co-direct Midnight Ramble (1994), a feature-length documentary on his career.

    New York, NY: Anthology Film Archives
    7:30 PM, 32 Second Avenue
    MILLENNIUM FILM JOURNAL NO. 67
    This program celebrates the publication of Millennium Film Journal No. 67, which offers an indication of the expanse of territory explored by contemporary moving images artists: from celluloid to GIFs, from installations to intimate screenings, working with materials personal or impersonal created with diverse methods and in multiple technologies, or drawn from many types of archive, from family photos to graphic fragments pulled from internet pornography. This program is a sampling of that cornucopia. Programmed by Rachel Stevens & Grahame Weinbren, with help from Josh Guilford and Seth Watter. All film descriptions adapted from Millennium Film Journal No. 67. For more info about Millennium, visit: mfj-online.org Lorna Mills & collaborators WAYS OF SOMETHING [Episode 1 excerpt] (2014, 16 min, digital) "Mills invited over a hundred, mostly North American and European artists to produce a one-minute moving image sequence in response to an excerpt of equivalent length from John Berger's original BBC program [WAYS OF SEEING]. Mills selected and edited 114 of these 'crowd-sourced' responses into a four-part video that mirrors the original program's episodic structure and is precisely synced to Berger's voiceover." -Johanna Gosse, "Ways of Seeing After the Internet" Dan Browne PALMERSTON BLVD (2017, 16 min, digital) "I had started taking photographs of my living room window as a means of working towards an increased sense of awareness, a means for experiencing how seemingly static things encountered amidst one's daily existence change slowly over time. By the time the project was finished, I had taken 250,000 images (or twice as many as all of my other photographs combined) and inadvertently documented my first year of domestic life as a parent." -Dan Browne, from "Fever in the Insta-Archive: An Interview with Dan Browne" by Clint Enns Lorna Mills & Yoshi Sodeoka MONEY2 (2012, 1 min, digital) Lorna Mills ETHEREAL IMPERIAL NO. 2 (2017, 3 min, digital) Lorna Mills ETHEREAL IMPERIAL NO. 4 (2017, 3 min, digital) "What strikes [one] on first viewing of a loop by Lorna Mills is the apparent ugliness of it all: ugliness in terms of subject or content and ugliness in terms of pictorial structure. Beauty, traditionally, prolongs its perception by swinging the eye on a grand tour of sorts; and ugly is that which distracts and confuses and makes the eye smart from its overexertion." -Seth Barry Watter, "Lorna Mills, or the Uses of Ugliness" Naeem Mohaiemen RANKIN STREET, 1953 (2013, 8 min, digital) "In TRIPOLI CANCELLED (discussed in MFJ 67) the kernel of the story is born of an auto-biographical morsel - a story about how Mohaiemen's father was stuck in this very airport for nine days without a passport before the Bangladeshi embassy intervened - and many of the details are pulled from Naeem Mohaiemen's real life, but the essence and structure of the story are a dream-like fiction. In contrast, RANKIN STREET, 1953 engages quite directly with traces of Mohaiemen's personal family history and archive, particularly of his father, through looking at the first photographs his father ever made, shot in their family home." -Rachel Stevens, "Naeem Mohaiemen's TRIPOLI CANCELED" Alee Peoples DECOY (2017, 11 min, 16mm) "Watching celluloid requires coming together with a bunch of strangers, sharing sights and sounds in a darkened room, maybe making a friend. More than a showcase for the moving image, the Light Field Festival proposes a view of art as a way to be together with other people creatively, while also suggesting that art's potential for inclusivity increases the more it experiments and deviates from normal experience. Along with other works, Alee People's suburban nightmare, DECOY, suggests the all-too-real terrors of the carceral state." - Patrick Harrison, "Gathering Momentum: Light Field 2017" Anita Thacher LOST / IN MEMORIAM (2010, 7.5 min, digital) "An ode to deceased women poets, beset with the burdens of motherhood and household, but nonetheless committed to expression of ideas, emotions, language, and art. Anita's empathy for her subjects runs through this film and her other works like a silver current." -Grahame Weinbren, "Anita Thacher Remembrance" Total running time: ca. 70 min.

    Wednesday, May 9, 2018
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    Austin, TX: Experimental Response Cinema
    8pm, Museum of Human Achievement
    Liminal Ethereal Space: Foster/Dixon/Domonkos
    For address: http://themuseumofhumanachievement.com/ - Experimental Response Cinema is honored to welcome filmmakers Gwendolyn Audrey Foster, Bill Domonkos and Wheeler Winston Dixon in person to present Liminal Ethereal Space. The experimental films of Gwendolyn Audrey Foster, Bill Domonkos and Wheeler Winston Dixon evoke a dream space between film and video, analog and digital, ritual and occult, real and fabulist; a cinematic space that is both dead and alive, perhaps best described as liminal ethereal. Foster, Domonkos, and Dixon employ a regenerative phoenix approach to détournement; all three use "found footage" and archival material in bringing dead things to life and vice versa. As Domonkos writes, "I aminterested in the poetics of time and space-to renew and transform materials, experiences and ideas. The extraordinary thing about cinema is its ability to suggest the ineffable-it is this elusive, dreamlike quality that informs my work." Dixon's video art conjures "a phantom zone, a world that doesn't exist - a world that is for the eye and ear alone." As Dixon sees it, "There are already enough images in the world. I prefer to use existing imagery, but in the process of playing with it to the point of abstraction, to create an other-worldly experience." Similarly, Foster prefers to work in a liminal aesthetic, with chance as her collaborator. "I am interested in spaces 'in between.' I often use "chance editing" (surrealist automatism). I prefer limitations: restrictions are liberating." Like the Surrealists, these three filmmakers allow ideas to slowly arise from found images and sounds, summoning liminal realities and ethereal spaces. PROGRAM: Film for Storm de Hirsch, Gwendolyn Audrey Foster (3min); Superluminal Time Travel, Gwendolyn Audrey Foster (5min); Sleeping with the Fishes, Gwendolyn Audrey Foster (2.5min); Say / Nothing, Gwendolyn Audrey Foster (8min); cul-de-sac, Gwendolyn Audrey Foster (3min); A Film for Chantal Akerman, Gwendolyn Audrey Foster (3min); Meantime, Bill Domonkos (4.5min); Lu deux fois, Bill Domonkos (3min); Nocturne, Bill Domonkos (5min); Logos, Bill Domonkos (3min); Orgone Beat, Bill Domonkos (6.5min); Endless North, Bill Domonkos (3min); Look, Wheeler Winston Dixon (3.5min); Double Wedding, Wheeler Winston Dixon (1min); The Big Idea, Wheeler Winston Dixon (4.5min); Ulysses on the Shore, Wheeler Winston Dixon (5min); Efficiency, Wheeler Winston Dixon (1.5min); Electric City, Wheeler Winston Dixon (2min); Borders, Wheeler Winston Dixon (1.5min); Downhill, Wheeler Winston Dixon (2min).

    Montréal: VISOINS
    21H, Cinémathèque québécoise
    VISIONS | 09+10.05.18 | MIKE ROLLO
    VISIONS, in collaboration with the Cinémathèque québécoise, presents: 09.05.18 | UNDER PRAIRIE SKIES [Works by Mike Rollo] + 10.05.18 | ACCENTS OF AIR AND EARTH [Works selected by Mike Rollo].

    Thursday, May 10, 2018
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    Nashville : FAR OUT NASHVILLE
    7pm, Third Man Records 623 7th Avenue South
    FAR OUT FILM FRST
    FOFF will present an evening of psychedelic cinema and expanded consciousness to compliment the hallucinatory sounds from the weekend's “acid-soaked” music festival.

    New York, New York: Le Petit Versailles Garden
    7 to 10 PM, 346 East Houston Street NYC — between Avenues B + C
    Lili White's I CHING ALCHEMY SCULPTURES & FILM SCREENING
    film screening on MAY 10th 2018 - 7 to 10 PM RAIN OR SHINE!

    San Francisco, California: San Francisco Cinematheque
    7:30, Artists' Television Access / 992 Valencia Street (at 21st Street) San Francisco, CA 94110
    Without Paths or Boundaries: Films of Sky Hopinka
    Sky Hopinka In Person // Admission: $10 General Admission/$5 for Cinematheque members // Presented in association with the Communication and Media Studies Department at Sonoma State University and the UC Berkeley Ethnic Studies Department // Sky Hopinka’s film work scrutinizes the layered structure of identity in relation to homeland, landscape and language. Like puzzles, his films are constructed with fragmented and superimposed images. Watching them is like experiencing memories inside of a dream, their fragments recomposed without any particular order by the unconscious. This does not make the result less truthful; quite the opposite, it is more real than ever. (Almudena Escobar López: Afterimage) Indigenous American filmmaker Sky Hopinka’s (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga) video work centers around personal positions of homeland and landscape, the precarity of indigenous languages and the concomitant reality of language as a container of culture. While depicting lives and locations from the Bering Sea to Standing Rock, Hopinka’s vision of the North American landscape and its people is borderless and tentative, and inclusive of individual account and collective memory as grounding forces central to cultural survival and resistance. Avoiding a documentary approach to filmmaking in favor of a more nuanced and obliquely angled approach to cinematic ethnopoetics, Hopinka’s lushly visual films often allude to persons and places not present and hint at stories and histories untold and perhaps not completely knowable as disparate voices—familial, poetic, ancestral and contemporary—speak across time and distance.

    Friday, May 11, 2018
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    New York, NY: Anthology Film Archives
    7:30 PM, 32 Second Avenue
    NATHANIEL DORSKY'S 'ARBORETUM CYCLE'
    FILMMAKER IN PERSON! Last October, Anthology hosted Nathaniel Dorsky, one of the modern masters of the art of 16mm filmmaking, for two evenings devoted to what was then a work-in-progress series of films shot over the course of the seasons at the San Francisco Arboretum. Now in its final, 7-part form, we're pleased to present three screenings of the full ARBORETUM CYCLE. Marked by a recurring exploration of planes of focus and an intricate structure of theme and variation, this magisterial work represents a distinct but typically exquisite chapter in Dorsky's body of work. "For the past several years California experienced an extreme drought. But this past winter good fortune brought a bountiful amount of storms and liquid refreshment. The spring that followed took on magical and celebratory qualities of energy, joy, fullness, and rebirth. In walking distance from my apartment is San Francisco's Arboretum located in Golden Gate Park. I decided that I would make a film now on a single subject and that subject would be the light - not the objects, but the sacredness of the light itself in this splendid garden. What I did not know is that the great beauty of this magnificent spring would bring forth not one, but seven films, each one immediately following the previous. I began to photograph on the second week of February and finished the editing of the seventh film during the last days of December. "These seven films spontaneously manifested as the stages of life: early childhood, youth, maturity, old age, and death. ELOHIM was photographed in early spring, the week of the lunar new year, the very spirit of creation. ABATON was photographed a few weeks later in the full ripeness of spring, the very purity and intoxication of passion. CODA was photographed in late spring, in the aftermath of this purity, the first shades of mortality and knowledge. ODE, photographed in early summer, is a soft-textured song of the fallen, the dissonant reds of death, seeds, and rebirth. SEPTEMBER is indeed, Indian summer, the halcyon swan song of earthly blessings. MONODY, shot in the fading autumnal glory, is an energized declaration of the end. And EPILOGUE, photographed in early December, rests in quietude, the garden's energy now descending into the dark, damp earth." -Nathaniel Dorsky THE ARBORETUM CYCLE: ELOHIM (2017, 31 min, 16mm, silent) ABATON (2017, 19 min, 16mm, silent) CODA (2017, 16 min, 16mm, silent) ODE (2017, 20 min, 16mm, silent) SEPTEMBER (2017, 20 min, 16mm, silent) MONODY (2017, 16 min, 16mm, silent) EPILOGUE (2017, 15 min, 16mm, silent) Total running time: 137 min.

    Saturday, May 12, 2018
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    New York, NY: Anthology Film Archives
    5:00 PM, 32 Second Avenue
    EC: 23RD PSALM BRANCH
    by Stan Brakhage. "The furthest that Brakhage came in extending the language of 8mm cinema was his editing of 23RD PSALM BRANCH... the phenomenal and painstaking craftsmanship of this film reflects the intensity of the obsession with which its theme grasped his mind. In 1966, out of confusion about the Vietnam War and the American reaction to it, Brakhage began to meditate on the nature of war... the fruit of his studies and thoughts was the longest and most important of the songs... it is an apocalypse of imagination." -P. Adams Sitney, VISIONARY FILM.

    New York, NY: Anthology Film Archives
    7:30 PM, 32 Second Avenue
    NATHANIEL DORSKY'S 'ARBORETUM CYCLE'
    FILMMAKER IN PERSON! Last October, Anthology hosted Nathaniel Dorsky, one of the modern masters of the art of 16mm filmmaking, for two evenings devoted to what was then a work-in-progress series of films shot over the course of the seasons at the San Francisco Arboretum. Now in its final, 7-part form, we're pleased to present three screenings of the full ARBORETUM CYCLE. Marked by a recurring exploration of planes of focus and an intricate structure of theme and variation, this magisterial work represents a distinct but typically exquisite chapter in Dorsky's body of work. "For the past several years California experienced an extreme drought. But this past winter good fortune brought a bountiful amount of storms and liquid refreshment. The spring that followed took on magical and celebratory qualities of energy, joy, fullness, and rebirth. In walking distance from my apartment is San Francisco's Arboretum located in Golden Gate Park. I decided that I would make a film now on a single subject and that subject would be the light - not the objects, but the sacredness of the light itself in this splendid garden. What I did not know is that the great beauty of this magnificent spring would bring forth not one, but seven films, each one immediately following the previous. I began to photograph on the second week of February and finished the editing of the seventh film during the last days of December. "These seven films spontaneously manifested as the stages of life: early childhood, youth, maturity, old age, and death. ELOHIM was photographed in early spring, the week of the lunar new year, the very spirit of creation. ABATON was photographed a few weeks later in the full ripeness of spring, the very purity and intoxication of passion. CODA was photographed in late spring, in the aftermath of this purity, the first shades of mortality and knowledge. ODE, photographed in early summer, is a soft-textured song of the fallen, the dissonant reds of death, seeds, and rebirth. SEPTEMBER is indeed, Indian summer, the halcyon swan song of earthly blessings. MONODY, shot in the fading autumnal glory, is an energized declaration of the end. And EPILOGUE, photographed in early December, rests in quietude, the garden's energy now descending into the dark, damp earth." -Nathaniel Dorsky THE ARBORETUM CYCLE: ELOHIM (2017, 31 min, 16mm, silent) ABATON (2017, 19 min, 16mm, silent) CODA (2017, 16 min, 16mm, silent) ODE (2017, 20 min, 16mm, silent) SEPTEMBER (2017, 20 min, 16mm, silent) MONODY (2017, 16 min, 16mm, silent) EPILOGUE (2017, 15 min, 16mm, silent) Total running time: 137 min.

    San Francisco, California: San Francisco Cinematheque
    8:30, Artists' Television Access / 992 Valencia Street (at 21st Street) San Francisco, CA 94110
    Other Cinema: Media Archeology3
    David Cox, Adrienne Finelli, Steve Polta, Dean Santomieri and Cyrus Tabar In Person // Presented in association with ATA’s Other Cinema // Admission: $7 (walk up sales only) // NOTICE! This special screening celebrates the re-pressing of the Craig Baldwin Science In Action Sound Sampler, an audio collage mash-up of soundtrack selections from Baldwin films 1978–1999. Assembled by San Francisco Cinematheque’s Steve Polta in 2003 and released in a (long out-of-print) CD edition of 99, Science In Action is now available on stereo audio cassette from ZAP Cassettes (and available for a limited time at Cinematheque’s online store). Other Cinema: Media Archeology3 Comes now the 3rd of Other Cinema’s signature Media showcases, and the world premiere of Dean Santomieri’s Monuments in Steel and Glass, a spoken-word turn on his tenure as his school’s film-projectionist. An educational on urban architecture embedded into his teenage brain the accursed idea of Industrial Progress! Cyrus Tabar is also in the house, presenting It Is What It Is, his award-winning memoir on family secrets, drawn exclusively from snapshots and home movies. David Cox looks not to the past but to the future with Mise-en-Experience, a delightful demonstration of Cardboard’s Virtual Reality, so bring your smart-phones if you dare. PLUS the debut of Adrianne Finelli’s (in person) At the Edge (on the pics between Reg8mm perfs), Kevin Obsatz’ Deux Champs (Two Fields) (on a Duchamp photo “accident’), an Optigan overture, and Sam Green’s celebration of Louis Armstrong’s 1/4” tape recordings! Co-produced with SF Cinematheque, this format fest also launches Baldwin/Polta’s Science in Action sound-sampler, bumped to tape by ZAP Cassettes. (Craig Baldwin)

    San Francisco, California: Other Cinema
    8 PM, 992 Valencia Street
    MEDIA ARCHEOLOGY3: CYRUS TABAR + DEAN SANTOMIERI + COX’ VR +
    Comes now the 3rd of our signature Media showcases, and the world premiere of Santomieri’s Monuments in Steel and Glass, a spoken-word turn on his tenure as his school’s film-projectionist. An educational on urban architecture embedded into his teenage brain the accursed idea of Industrial Progress! Cyrus Tabar is also in the house, presenting It Is What It Is, his award-winning memoir on family secrets, drawn exclusively from snapshots and home movies. David Cox looks not to the past but to the future with Mise-en-Experience, a delightful demonstration of Cardboard’s Virtual Reality, so bring your smart-phones if you dare. PLUS the debut of Adrianne Finelli’s (in person) At the Edge (on the pics between Reg8mm perfs), Kevin Obsatz’ Deux Champs (Two Fields) (on a Duchamp photo “accident’), an Optigan overture, and Sam Green’s celebration of Louis Armstrong’s 1/4” tape recordings! Co-produced with SF Cinematheque, this format fest also launches Baldwin/Polta’s SiA sound-sampler, bumped to tape by Zap Cassettes.

    Sunday, May 13, 2018
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    New York, NY: Anthology Film Archives
    4:45 PM, 32 Second Avenue
    EC: STAN BRAKHAGE PGM
    SONGS 24-26 (1967/85, 15 min, 8mm-to-16mm) MY MOUNTAIN: SONG 27 (1968, 25 min, 8mm-to-16mm) MY MOUNTAIN: SONG 27: PART 2: RIVERS (1969, 33 min, 8mm-to-16mm) SONGS 28-29 (1966/86, 21 min, 8mm-to-16mm) "SONGS 24 & 25: A naked boy and flute song; a being about nature. SONG 26: a 'conversation piece' - a vis-à-visual, inspired by the (e)motional properties of talk: drone, bird-like twitterings, statement terror & bombast. SONG 28: Scenes as texture. SONG 29: A portrait of the artist's mother." -Stan Brakhage Total running time: ca. 100 min.

    New York, NY: Anthology Film Archives
    7:30 PM, 32 Second Avenue
    NATHANIEL DORSKY'S 'ARBORETUM CYCLE'
    FILMMAKER IN PERSON! Last October, Anthology hosted Nathaniel Dorsky, one of the modern masters of the art of 16mm filmmaking, for two evenings devoted to what was then a work-in-progress series of films shot over the course of the seasons at the San Francisco Arboretum. Now in its final, 7-part form, we're pleased to present three screenings of the full ARBORETUM CYCLE. Marked by a recurring exploration of planes of focus and an intricate structure of theme and variation, this magisterial work represents a distinct but typically exquisite chapter in Dorsky's body of work. "For the past several years California experienced an extreme drought. But this past winter good fortune brought a bountiful amount of storms and liquid refreshment. The spring that followed took on magical and celebratory qualities of energy, joy, fullness, and rebirth. In walking distance from my apartment is San Francisco's Arboretum located in Golden Gate Park. I decided that I would make a film now on a single subject and that subject would be the light - not the objects, but the sacredness of the light itself in this splendid garden. What I did not know is that the great beauty of this magnificent spring would bring forth not one, but seven films, each one immediately following the previous. I began to photograph on the second week of February and finished the editing of the seventh film during the last days of December. "These seven films spontaneously manifested as the stages of life: early childhood, youth, maturity, old age, and death. ELOHIM was photographed in early spring, the week of the lunar new year, the very spirit of creation. ABATON was photographed a few weeks later in the full ripeness of spring, the very purity and intoxication of passion. CODA was photographed in late spring, in the aftermath of this purity, the first shades of mortality and knowledge. ODE, photographed in early summer, is a soft-textured song of the fallen, the dissonant reds of death, seeds, and rebirth. SEPTEMBER is indeed, Indian summer, the halcyon swan song of earthly blessings. MONODY, shot in the fading autumnal glory, is an energized declaration of the end. And EPILOGUE, photographed in early December, rests in quietude, the garden's energy now descending into the dark, damp earth." -Nathaniel Dorsky THE ARBORETUM CYCLE: ELOHIM (2017, 31 min, 16mm, silent) ABATON (2017, 19 min, 16mm, silent) CODA (2017, 16 min, 16mm, silent) ODE (2017, 20 min, 16mm, silent) SEPTEMBER (2017, 20 min, 16mm, silent) MONODY (2017, 16 min, 16mm, silent) EPILOGUE (2017, 15 min, 16mm, silent) Total running time: 137 min.

    Oakland: Shapeshifters Cinema
    7:30-10PM, Temescal Art Center, 511 48th St.
    Shapeshifters Cinema presents Kristin Cato and David Cox
    Multi-disciplinarian Kristin Cato (filmmaker, theatermaker, writer, sound designer, semiotician and violinist) will present The Numbers Project, a live cinema event of performed poetry with video projections about whole numbers—their shapes, associations, spiritual meanings and cultural roles. A work in progress developed over the past few years, The Numbers Project consists of one poem for each number—zero through thirteen—with most of the imagery coming from historical/educational math and science films. So far, the project has been performed in installments—"Zero One Two", "Three Four Five", and "Planet Six" (an interplanetary countup and homage to space activity and historical representations of it). This event will be the first showing of all parts presented in one continuum, and includes the new "Star Seven" section with violin accompaniment. While we are still in conceptual orbit, David Cox (filmmaker, artist, writer and educator) will present two space-themed projects including excerpts from his forthcoming Rocket Opera with live musical accompaniment from baritone John Smalley and mezzo soprano Anna Samborsca, plus a presentation of his 1998 sci-fi short Otherzone (originally shot in 35mm).


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