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This week [July 15 - 22, 2018] in avant garde cinema

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Events are sorted alphabetically BY CITY within each DATE .
This page is updated every Sunday.
  • Sunday, July 15, 2018
  • Tuesday, July 17, 2018
  • Wednesday, July 18, 2018
  • Thursday, July 19, 2018
  • Saturday, July 21, 2018
  • Sunday, July 22, 2018
  • This week's programs (summary):

    Sunday, July 15, 2018
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    Los Angeles, California: Filmforum
    7:30 pm, Spielberg Theatre at the Egyptian, 6712 Hollywood Blvd.
    Dream Reconstructions, by Miklos Erdély
    In collaboration with the Wende Museum and the Getty Research Institute Miklós Erdély was a Hungarian architect, artist, writer, and filmmaker who in the 1960s-1980s became a key figure in Budapest's neo-avant-garde artistic circles. When the renowned Balázs Béla Studio created an opportunity for non-professional filmmakers to make films, Erdély was among the artists who seized it. Erdély's Dream Reconstructions attempts to represent the unrepresentable -- in three different sequences, we see three individuals trying to reconstruct their dreams. The film probes the relationship between personal experience and interpersonal communication, mobilizing the tools of cinema and using experimental editing techniques to mimic the workings of the subconscious. The screening of this film coincides with the exhibition Promote, Tolerate, Ban: Art and Culture in Cold War Hungary, co-presented by the Wende Museum and the Getty Research Institute and on view at the Wende Museum until August 26. For more information on the exhibition and other events accompanying it, visit www.wendemuseum.org Tickets: $10 general; $6 for students/seniors; free for Filmforum members. Available in advance from Brown Paper Tickets at https://erdely.bpt.me or at the door.

    New York, NY: Anthology Film Archives
    4:30 PM, 32 Second Avenue
    DELIVER
    by Jennifer Montgomery. "DELIVER is Montgomery's all-female reworking of John Boorman's classic 1972 film DELIVERANCE (based on James Dickey's novel). More than simply a gender reversal, however, the film raises complicated and provocative questions about hegemonic structures of gender and issues of female homosocial violence. Moreover, by casting well-known experimental filmmakers Peggy Ahwesh, Jackie Goss, Su Friedrich, Meredith Root, and Montgomery herself as semi-fictional versions of themselves, DELIVER also examines the often difficult position of feminist experimental filmmaking within the academic art world." -UC SANTA CRUZ FILM AND DIGITAL MEDIA

    Tuesday, July 17, 2018
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    Los Angeles, California: Dirty Looks
    7PM, Mercado La Paloma, 3655 S Grand Ave #240
    The Night is Young
    Ramon Novarro, an immigrant from Durango, Mexico, rose to fame as a silent film-era leading man and sex symbol throughout the 1920s and 1930s. He is now mostly remembered for the grisly homicide that ended his life at the hands of two male prostitutes in the 1960s, a fact which has obscured his achievements as a film, stage, and television actor, and his legacy as a queer and brown silver screen pioneer. In this cultural moment of heightened attention to the equitable representation of historically oppressed communities in mainstream Hollywood, THE NIGHT IS YOUNG invites attendees to revisit the legacy of queer and immigrant performers of color at the infancy of Hollywood blockbuster filmmaking. The Night is Young, a musical romantic comedy, features Novarro in his best light in one of MGM’s first “talkies.” Mercado La Paloma, located in the historically divested Figueroa Corridor of South Los Angeles, is a vibrant community gathering space housed in a revitalized garment factory and modelled after the bustling markets which local immigrant residents left behind in their home countries. Conceived in 1999 as an experiment in community revitalization, it provides economic and artistic opportunities for local residents and seeks to support and showcase the unique heritage of the area’s residents to the broader LA community. Dudley Murphy, The Night is Young, 35mm on DVD, 81 min, 1935 Curated by Young Joon Kwak & Marvin Astorga

    New York, NY: Anthology Film Archives
    6:30 PM, 32 Second Avenue
    DELIVER
    by Jennifer Montgomery. "DELIVER is Montgomery's all-female reworking of John Boorman's classic 1972 film DELIVERANCE (based on James Dickey's novel). More than simply a gender reversal, however, the film raises complicated and provocative questions about hegemonic structures of gender and issues of female homosocial violence. Moreover, by casting well-known experimental filmmakers Peggy Ahwesh, Jackie Goss, Su Friedrich, Meredith Root, and Montgomery herself as semi-fictional versions of themselves, DELIVER also examines the often difficult position of feminist experimental filmmaking within the academic art world." -UC SANTA CRUZ FILM AND DIGITAL MEDIA

    Wednesday, July 18, 2018
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    Los Angeles, California: Dirty Looks
    8PM, The Black Cat (formerly Black Cat Tavern, Le Bar), 3909 Sunset Blvd
    Myra Breckinridge
    One of the most relentlessly queer films ever produced by a major studio, MYRA BRECKINRIDGE brought together icons of Old and New Hollywood – Mae West, Raquel Welch and Farrah Fawcett – in a story about transgender identity that is at once irreverent, outrageous, and quaintly inept. Trigger Warning. Penned by legendary author and cultural critic Gore Vidal, MYRA BRECKINRIDGE is a merciless display of hard-core camp. The film offers a satirical portrait of Hollywood at the end of the 1960s, caught in the transition away from the manufactured glamour of the Golden Age and into a sexually liberated Age of Aquarius. Written at a moment in which queer communities around the United States were fighting for equality and greater visibility, the film represented homosexuality and transgender issues in startlingly new and provocative ways. Often considered one of the worst films ever made, one contemporaneous reviewer called it “an incoherent tale of sodomy, emasculation, autoeroticism and plain bad taste.” One person’s trash is another person’s treasure. This event takes place in a building that holds an important place in LA’s queer history. The Black Cat Tavern was the site of one of the first uprisings of LGBTQ people in the country in 1967. email info@dirtylooksLA.org for table reservations Curated by Ryan Linkof

    New York, New York: Another Experiment by Women Film Festival
    6 PM, Anthology Film Archives, 32 2nd Ave, New York, NY 10003
    IMAGINING MINUTES
    THE RACONTEUR; Rebecca Krasnik; Denmark/USA; 3.00; ARMS; Lucie Friederike Mueller; Austria / Germany; 2.57; PLEASE COME AGAIN; Alisa Yang; USA; 9.00; 1st DAY & NEXT MINUTE; Sara Koppel; MUSIC & SOUND; Sune Køter Kølster; Denmark; 2.30; LETTER FROM THE GONE WORLD; Lydia Moyer; USA; 17.00; STONES FOR THUNDER; Kera MacKenzie & Andrew Mausert-Mooney; USA; 16:21

    Portland: Oregon Department of Kick Ass
    7:30, 3727 NE 11th Avenue
    A Night With Danny Lyon
    Artist Vanessa Renwick (of The Oregon Department of Kick Ass) and PMOMA present photographer/writer/filmmaker Danny Lyon and two of his films: WILLIE and MURDERERS. A Q&A with Lyon will follow the films. A seminal activist artist working in the style of New Journalism, Lyon transitioned from photographing civil rights events in the ‘60s to making in-depth photographic studies and documentary films. His work always telegraphs a deep sense of empathy for outlaws, outcasts, and underdogs staking their claims at the fringes of society. This screening pairs two films: WILLIE (1985, 82 minutes) profiles his friend Willie Jaramillo and his repeated tangles with the law in Bernalillo, New Mexico; MURDERERS (2005, 30 minutes), shares the shocking and surprisingly vulnerable stories of five murderers in three different states.

    Thursday, July 19, 2018
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    Los Angeles, California: Dirty Looks
    9PM, The Handbag Factory, 1336 S Grand Ave
    Rooftop Party at the Handbag Factory
    Handbag Factory has served as a key performance space for Queer and Trans noise, video, and punk artists throughout it’s 7-year history. Handbag is situated in the rapidly gentrifying South Park neighborhood of Downtown Los Angeles and serves as a cultural oasis in a sea of cookie-cutter condos. Rooftop Party at Handbag Factory will feature performances by Gaylord Fiend, Poor Impulse Width Modulation, and VisionVision with live analog visuals by Alex Pelly. GAYLORD FIEND is the brainchild project of fashion/Makeup artist Fenex Lopez. GF is the culmination of modern performance art and existential poetry combining dark and synth heavy dance music. https://soundcloud.com/redfenex NAOMI MITCHELL makes music as POOR IMPULSE WIDTH MODULATION and designs and builds modular synthesizers as Omiindustriies. Her work explores rhythm and randomness. She lives and works in Los Angeles. Omiindustriies is a synth manufacturer that makes modular synthesizers that facilitate new and interesting conversations between artists and electronics located in Los Angeles, CA. VISIONVISION is a collaborative performance and video art project by artists Edgar Fabián Frías and Sarah Zucker. They fuse the gorgeous and the grotesque in transmissions of pungent iridescence, combining elements of drag, humor, mysticism and psychedelia into mutant televangelism from the etheric realms. Edgar Fabián Frías, MA is a Los Angeles based Latinx queer and nonbinary interdisciplinary artist, mental health therapist, musician, curator, brujx, autonomous community organizer, radical educator, visionary, and leader. Frías work explores the sacred and the profane utilizing ad-hoc and amorphous indigenous, pagan, contemporary, and queer(ed) methodologies. Often smuggling information across borders and boundaries of vocational, governmental, conceptual, and chimeric regimentions.Sarah Zucker is an interdisciplinary artist based in Los Angeles. Her work combines obsolete and cutting edge technologies with performance to yield visions of a neon future that never was. She produces curatorial projects as The Current Sea, and runs YoMeryl, an art + animation studio with her partner Bronwyn Lundberg. She is a Jeopardy! Champion. ALEX PELLY is a filmmaker and video artist based in Los Angeles. Creating projections and video installation for music and parties around Los Angeles since 2009, Alex designed live shows for synth pop band ESP from 2011-2013, and was resident visualist for underground techno party, Perpetual Dawn from 2015-2017. She continues to design shows for noise duo Telecaves. She is immersed in video art that blends digital animation, modular video synthesis and analog feedback and processing. She has shown work at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, Gagosian Gallery in Beverly Hills, Hauser and Wirth in Los Angeles, Coaxial Arts, and as part of LA Weekly's Artopia. Curated by Coaxial $10

    San Francisco, California: McEvoy Foundation for the Arts
    7pm, 1150 25th St, Building B,
    FOR THE SAKE OF SUMMER | LOVE IT OR LEAVE IT
    MFA hosts Love it or Leave it, an evening of short, experimental 16mm films, co-presented with Canyon Cinema. The program features works by Jack Smith, Julie Murray, Jodie Mack, Lewis Klahr, Scott Stark, Tomonari Nishikawa, and Tom Palazzolo. These films employ familiar images and artifacts of mid-20th-century popular culture, laying bare an enthralling decadence of Western fantasy, consumerism, and excess. Love it or Leave it 16mm Film Program: Jack Smith, Song for Rent, 1969, 4 min. Julie Murray, FF, 1986, 10 min. Jodie Mack, Point de Gaze, 2012, 5 min. Lewis Klahr, Altair, 1994, 8 min. Scott Stark, Back in the Saddle Again, 1997, 10 min. Tomonari Nishikawa, 45 7 Broadway, 2013, 5 min. Tom Palazzolo, Love It/Leave It, 1973, 15 min

    Saturday, July 21, 2018
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    Los Angeles, California: Dirty Looks
    4PM, Mandrake Bar, 2692 La Cienega Blvd
    The Pirate and the MGM Freed Unit
    THE PIRATE, which stars Judy Garland was a sensational flop for the studio (and a loose basis for the Neely O’Hara breakdown Western in VALLEY OF THE DOLLS), was produced by the MGM Freed unit, the production team responsible for hits ranging from THE WIZARD OF OZ, SINGING IN THE RAIN to GIGI and whose embellished costumes and scenery offered an early gay codified theatricality. Of note are two particularly theatrical dance numbers performed by Gene Kelly. There is an interesting backstory to the film’s self-censorship of black entertainers – a part was written and then dropped for Lena Horne, and a scene shot with The Nicholas Brothers, who were a huge dance sensation at Harlem’s Cotton Club, but was cut from Southern presentations of the film. The outré aspects of the film’s homosexual production unit (which includes the famed homosexual director, Minnelli) proved covert enough to skirt by while the excised or barely permitted integration of its performers proves an interesting, if problematic understanding of counter-culture in the late 1940s. Mandrake opened as a haven to the gallery boom that erupted in Culver City in the early 2000s. Its spartan decor easily accommodated screenings like Hedi El Kholti’s (editor of theory publisher, Semiotext(e)) Deleuze from A-Z series, or my first Los Angeles screening, in point of fact. Vincente Minnelli, The Pirate, 35mm on dv, 102 min, 1948 Curated and with introduction by Bradford Nordeen

    Sunday, July 22, 2018
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    Berlin, Germany: Light Movement
    8.00pm., Spektrum, Bürknerstraße 12
    Through a Different Lens / Film Work by Joanna Margaret Paul
    "All my films, poems, paintings play more or less between inner and outer events" - Joanna Margaret Paul. JOANNA MARGARET PAUL (1955-2003) was a New Zealand artist who pioneered interdisciplinary practice, working prolifically across the mediums of film, poetry and painting. Often shot and edited in camera, her film work chronicled motherhood and domestic life (Task, Napkins), the worn traces of urban settlement (Port Chalmers Cycle) and the persistent presence of the natural world. Other works such as Sisterhood portrayed the life of other female artists identified with the 1970s womens movement in New Zealand. Curated by Peter Todd, Through a Different Lens / Film Work by Joanna Margaret Paul is the first collection of Joanna Margaret Paul’s moving image work to make Paul’s work available to an international audience. In Todd’s accompanying essay he places her work in the lineage of film-makers Margaret Tait and Robert Bresson, and painter Frances Hodgkins. Through a Different Lens / Film Work by Joanna Margaret Paul contains 13 works shot in the 1970s that have been transferred from 8mm and 16mm film to high definition video. ‘Paul’s films were made in relative artistic isolation from avant-garde film discourse in the mid-1970s, but are rooted in an acute feminist politics that focuses on concerns of shared female social spaces and everyday domestic situations.’ —FRIEZE.

    Los Angeles, California: Filmforum
    7:30 pm, Spielberg Theatre at the Egyptian, 6712 Hollywood Blvd.
    Fernando Llanos: Matria
    Los Angeles premiere! Fernando Llanos in person! Antolin Jiménez fought alongside Pancho Villa, represented the state of Oaxaca in Congress, and was the president of the National Charro Association. In 1942 as rumors spread of a Nazi invasion of Mexico Jimenez formed and trained a group of 100 000 fighters to repel the attack. Seventy years later Jimenez’s grandson Fernando Llanos brings us the film Matria tracing the director’s quest to understand more about his mysterious grandfather and the culture of charros in the mid-20th century. Deeply rooted family secrets are unearthed in the process and what begins as a character profile becomes an entangled story of family lore and a window into the history of modern Mexico. “An irreverent, courageous and moving portrait.” -- Martha Sosa, Film producer (Amores Perros, Presunto Culpable) Tickets: $10 general; $6 for students/seniors; free for Filmforum members. Available in advance from Brown Paper Tickets at https://matria.bpt.me or at the door.

    Minneapolis, Minnesota: Cellular Cinema
    7:00 pm, Bryant Lake Bowl Theater, 810 W Lake St
    Cellular Cinema 36 - Aurora Picture Show: Extremely Shorts
    Guest Curator: Sarah Stauder For over 20 years, Aurora Picture Show’s Extremely Shorts Film Festival has showcased a diverse selection of adventurous, new short films and videos–each 3 minutes or less. This unique festival has become a lively Houston tradition, providing audiences with opportunities to experience a wide-ranging cross section of new visions from local, national, and international artists. This touring program is a curated survey featuring films from the U.S., Canada, Japan, France, and Italy that have been featured in the festival over the last two decades.


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