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This week [February 19 - 26, 2017] in avant garde cinema

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This page is updated every Sunday.
  • , February 19, 2017
  • , February 20, 2017
  • , February 21, 2017
  • , February 22, 2017
  • , February 23, 2017
  • , February 24, 2017
  • , February 25, 2017
  • Sunday, February 26, 2017
  • This week's programs (summary):

    Sunday, February 19, 2017
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    Brooklyn, New York: Microscope Gallery
    7:30pm, 1329 Willoughby Ave 2B
    YES: Nicholas Steindorf & Kyle Williams
    Q&A with the artist follows.For the first 2017 edition of Microscope's emerging artist series YES we screen new and recent video works by Brooklyn-based artists Nicholas Steindorf and Kyle Williams, including those made under their collaboration Binn & Lambert. In playful and paradoxical works such as Family and Pyramid Kyle Williams is concerned with alternative ways of looking at everyday objects, providing them with a new life and appearance on screen, often involving special lighting and the construction of props and mechanical apparatuses. Nicholas Steindorf's meticulous 3D modeled and animated videos research the singular and poetic within the digital realm through two distinct projects. The collaboration Binn & Lambert finds a calibrated mix of these two individual approaches, leading to another unique universe of works. More info: www.microscopegallery.com. info@microscopegallery.com, 347.952.1433. Jefferson St. L (exit Starr St)

    Los Angeles, California: Filmforum
    7:30 pm, Spielberg Theatre at the Egyptian, 6712 Hollywood Blvd
    The Festival of (In)appropriation #9
    Curators Jaimie Baron & Greg Cohen with filmmakers Roger Beebe, Tony Gault, and Kevin McCarthy in person! Whether you call it collage, compilation, found footage, détournement, or recycled cinema, the incorporation of already existing media into new artworks is a practice that generates novel juxtapositions and new meanings and ideas, often in ways entirely unrelated to the intentions of the original makers. Such new works are, in other words, “inappropriate.” This act of (in)appropriation may even produce revelations about the relationship between past and present, here and there, intention and subversion, artist and critic, not to mention the "producer" and "consumer" of visual culture itself. Fortunately for our purposes, the past decade has witnessed the emergence of a wealth of new audiovisual elements available for appropriation into new works. Featuring films by Deborah Kelly, Tina Takemoto, Christopher Harris, Daniela Zahiner, Tony Gault, Roger Beebe, Ryan Murray, Kevin McCarthy, Yunjin Woo and more! For more event information: www.lafilmforum.org, or 323-377-7238

    Vancouver, British Columbia: Iris Film Collective
    6-9pm, 3434 Falaise Avenue
    BUNGALOW by Alex MacKenzie
    see Feb 13 for details

    , February 20, 2017
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    New York, NY: Anthology Film Archives
    7:30 PM, 32 Second Avenue
    AFA MEMBERS ONLY: CHANTAL AKERMAN + LEONARD COHEN
    AFA MEMBERS ONLY - FREE SCREENING! Once every calendar we offer a special, AFA Members Only screening, featuring sneak-previews of upcoming features, programs of rare materials from Anthology's collections, in-person filmmaker presentations, and more! The benefits of an Anthology membership have always been plentiful: free admission to over 100 Essential Cinema programs, reduced admission to all other shows, discounted AFA publications. But with these screenings - free and open only to members - we sweeten the pot even further. Presented alongside our tribute to Leonard Cohen, this quarter's Members Only event showcases Chantal Akerman's very rarely-screened PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG GIRL AT THE END OF THE 1960S IN BRUSSELS. Produced for the series "Tous les garçons et les filles de leur âge…," which would also include Olivier Assayas's COLD WATER, Andre Téchiné's WILD REEDS, and Claire Denis's U.S. GO HOME, it memorably features Cohen both as part of its soundtrack (via his song, "Suzanne") and as part of its plot (a key moment finds the protagonist shoplifting one of Cohen's records). Chantal Akerman PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG GIRL AT THE END OF THE 1960S IN BRUSSELS / PORTRAIT D'UNE JEUNE FILLE DE LA FIN DES ANNÉES 60 À BRUXELLES (1994, 62 min, 16mm-to-digital) "Akerman's film moves beyond being one of the great coming-of-age films; it is simply one of the great films. A moving, multifaceted, and magical hour, presented with honesty and subtle artistry. The film's nuances are beyond summary. So, some sketches: A girl has decided to ditch school forever; she tears up her report card. At the movies, a boy next to her touches her leg with his; they talk, they kiss. They spend the day together. The girl makes plans to attend a party. They steal a Leonard Cohen record. She breaks into a relative's house so the boy has a place to sleep. Things happen beyond these sketches, but I will leave them aside. These simple events are full of poetry, of confusion, discovery, ambivalence, insecurity, beauty. The title character is played by Circé Lethem (who, incidentally, is the daughter of Belgian filmmaker Roland Lethem). She is luminous. Her character thinks that her friend is much prettier, but even though she's right she's also wrong and it's the boy who's right, the boy who thinks she's beautiful." -Dave McDougall, MUBIReception at 7:00!

    San Francisco, California 94114: Oddball Films
    8pm, Swedish American Hall, 2174 Market St
    When I Lay My Burden Down: Alan Lomax Films, 1937-1983
    Together with the Noise Pop Film Series, Oddball Films and the San Francisco Media Archive are thrilled to present WHEN I LAY MY BURDEN DOWN, an evening of films by legendary ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax. One of America's most significant and indomitable archivists, Lomax exhaustively documented traditional musical performances for seven decades, and the vast collection he left behind has shaped much of our understanding of folk traditions across America and the world. Lomax shot the films in this program between 1937 and 1983, in locales ranging from Haiti to Kentucky, the Mississippi Delta to the Newport Folk Festival. Nathan Salzburg, curator of the Alan Lomax Archive, will be on hand to give a presentation and Q&A session after the screening.

    Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Early Monthly Segments
    8:00 PM, Gladstone Hotel, 1214 Queen Street West
    EARLY MONTHLY SEGMENTS #93 = Midi Onodera's "The Displaced View" IN PERSON!
    Midi Onodera’s The Displaced View details the experience of three generations of Japanese Canadians, starting primarily with her grandmother’s Issei generation—the first large scale group of Japanese immigrants to Canada—through her mother’s Nisei generation and her own Sensei peers. Collaged from the oral histories of a number of women, the film tells the story of the difficulty of making a home in Canada—both in the hostility of internment during the War and the more generalized racism after and in the dispersion of historical traditions that dissolve across generations. A sensitive, subtle film designed as a vessel for cultural reflection, The Displaced View resonates anew as our country again contemplates how we will welcome our next potential citizens. “I imagine that before WW II, many immigrants did not expect to be treated kindly by their adopted country. But for whatever reason they could not return to their place of birth and instead learned to live with intolerance and discrimination. Most people of my grandmother’s generation developed a strong sense of pride for their new homeland. But as the generations get further away from that first generation of New Canadians, we find it difficult to believe that life could have been worse in their birth country.” —Midi Onodera Programme: The Displaced View, Midi Onodera, Canada, 1988, 16mm, 52 minutes, colour/B&W, sound https://www.facebook.com/events/1409032272461416/

    Vancouver, British Columbia: Iris Film Collective
    6-9pm, 3434 Falaise Avenue
    BUNGALOW by Alex MacKenzie
    see Feb 13 for details

    , February 21, 2017
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    New York, NY: Anthology Film Archives
    6:00 PM, 32 Second Avenue
    NEWFILMMAKERS
    For full program listings, visit www.newfilmmakers.com.

    Vancouver, British Columbia: Iris Film Collective
    6-9pm, 3434 Falaise Avenue
    BUNGALOW by Alex MacKenzie
    see Feb 13 for details

    , February 22, 2017
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    Austin, Texas 78701: Experimental Response Cinema
    7:30pm, Alamo Ritz, 320 E 6th St
    Eteam's Space Delay (with filmmakers in person!)
    Experimental Response Cinema is proud to present a program of video works by eteam. With the filmmakers in attendance to present the works. Track One, 2m, 2011, HD video. The time is now! The present can be replaced in real time. Not quite yet by the future, but very easily by the past? Eteam’s video “Track One” is a replay of such time disjuncture. As they keep following the memory of a yellow cab that keeps driving through the now deserted streets of Taipei, their pastime augments itself with a mesmerizing sense of reality. Space Delay, 76m, 2015, HD video. One of the most terrestrial exchanges between humans – the sale of a plot of land – is the beginning of a bizarre American odyssey when the artist duoeteam buys an acre of the Southwestern desert on eBay. The deed never arrives in the mail, so eteam attempts to track down the phantom seller, a porous Internet characters operating as Larry and Radonna, Eclectic Treasure Collection, or the Barefoot Shaman. A virtual search for them turns actual when eteam travels to confront him in person, children in tow. Their first destination is a suspicious little house in Colorado where no one, thankfully, answers the door. From there the family embarks on a peculiar road trip through the indelible landscape of the American west, with its forlorn chain hotels and abandoned pool patios, over-bright restaurants and otherworldly geological formations. Larry the Barefoot Shaman becomes an allegory for the Information Age, his shadowy digital existence contrasted by the overwhelming physical presence of the Grand Canyon, the Crater Fields, the Painted Desert. In this setting, caught up in a hopeless pursuit, the family feels more acutely foreign and unmoored, guided by ghosts and haunted by cultural associations that are increasingly surreal. At last, they arrive at their single acre of desert. The family camps there for three days, until two Navajo County Sheriffs crash into their obsessive fever dream. Writing up paperwork in their air-conditioned sedan, the officers reduce the family to its informational constitution, while also vividly punctuating SPACE DELAY's strange post-human Western. (Rebecca Cleman)

    Vancouver, British Columbia: Iris Film Collective
    6-9pm, 3434 Falaise Avenue
    BUNGALOW by Alex MacKenzie
    see Feb 13 for details

    , February 23, 2017
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    New York, NY: Anthology Film Archives
    6:00 PM, 32 Second Avenue
    NEWFILMMAKERS
    For full program listings, visit www.newfilmmakers.com.

    New York, New York: Anthology Film Archives
    7:30 pm, 32 2nd Ave.
    Show & Tell: Kenneth Curwood
    Kenneth Zoran Curwood is a Brooklyn-based artist and filmmaker. His energetic 16mm films and film performances combine traditional animation practices (cel, rotoscope, stop-motion) with many bygone special effects techniques (slit-scan, optical printing, tinting, toning). Curwood creates his dizzying images through DIY optical printing – taking apart old movie cameras and projectors, and re-purposing them to photograph movies one frame at a time – and hand-processing in home-made chemical mixtures. His films have shown extensively across the U.S. and elsewhere, and we’re thrilled to host him in person for this show of recent 16mm work and live film performance! “In 2009, after art school in NYC, a growing disaffection with the gallery network, and ten years of assorted trade employment (stained-glass, carpentry, tile-setting, etc.), I saw a Throbbing Gristle performance in which they played a live score to a Derek Jarman film. It completely cracked me open. I bought a Super 8 camera the next day. Ten years of pent up creativity found an escape valve through the lens of a tiny and practically obsolete device. I became obsessed. I taught myself how to hand process film. Due to my growing interest in in-camera effects I soon graduated to shooting 16mm. My homemade animation stand morphed into a DIY optical printer. There were explorations into chemical alterations: tinting, toning, bleaching, solarization; old animation techniques: cel, cut-out, rotoscope, stop-motion; archaic special effects: matte work, multiple exposures, slit-scan, aerial image printing…each venture leading to the next. “This program will include a chronological survey of films from 2009-14. Since I have never worked with a lab all my films are camera originals, and once screened became fair game to reuse in other works, so the exact format of the screening is yet to be determined; however I can say that there will be one or two live performance works in the course of the program, as well as some documentation of my home film studio.” –Kenneth Curwood

    Vancouver, British Columbia: Iris Film Collective
    6-9pm, 3434 Falaise Avenue
    BUNGALOW by Alex MacKenzie
    see Feb 13 for details

    , February 24, 2017
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    San Francisco, California: Adobe Books
    7-10pm, 3130 24th St, San Francisco, California 94110
    Kattt & Kenneth Atchley•Szamanka•Collin McKelvey & Paul Clipson
    An evening of sound and music performances by Kattt & Kenneth Atchley, Szamanka and Collin McKelvey performing with Paul Clipson screening a 16mm film.

    Vancouver, British Columbia: Iris Film Collective
    6-9pm, 3434 Falaise Avenue
    BUNGALOW by Alex MacKenzie
    see Feb 13 for details

    , February 25, 2017
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    Dallas, TX: Spectacle Society
    7:30 pm, 800 Exposition Ave
    A Roll for Peter: A Tribute Screening for Peter Hutton
    Spectacle Society is pleased to host a night in tribute to filmmaker Peter Hutton. Mr. Hutton made poetic portraits of cities and landscapes. Admission is free, but a modest donation is appreciated to help us cover the cost of prints.

    Los Angeles, California: Filmforum
    7:30 pm, Spielberg Theatre at the Egyptian, 6712 Hollywood Blvd
    Stop and Look: Three Films by Sergei Loznitsa
    Sergei Loznitsa is one of the most heralded filmmakers in Europe, but is still little known in America. Generously supported by the Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts, Filmforum presents Loznitsa in Los Angeles for his first time, for in-person screenings at Filmforum, UCLA, Cal Arts, and Cinefamily. This is the first night of the series, featuring the award-winning short films The Train Station and The Letter, followed by the remarkable hour-long Blockade. The Train Stop is a portrait of a quiet train station and the people waiting there; The Letter is an unnerving look at a few residents of a mental asylum. Blockade, anticipating his film The Event (screening next Wednesday at Cinefamily), re-edits film shot during the WWII blockade of Leningrad. Utilizing the material shot by a wide range of camera people trapped in the suffering city, Loznitsa finds a new poetry and eloquence, giving a new generation access to events rarely discussed. Tickets: $10 general; $6 for students/seniors; free for Filmforum members. Available in advance from Brown Paper Tickets at http://loznitsafilms.bpt.me or at the door.

    San Francisco, California: Other Cinema
    8:30 PM, 992 Valencia St.
    NOW! + BLACK SAN FRANCISCO + ATTICA
    Co-curated with the radical film e-zine Now!, this program honors Black History Month with a selection of new cinema that steps up to the crisis of US racial justice. Launching another year for the journal, in person is its editor, Alex Johnston, with his The Evidence of the Evidence (on Attica). His archival epic is preceded by a brave and beautiful filmic conversation on the Afro-American past and present: Kelly Gallagher’s More Dangerous Than A Thousand Rioters (on Lucy Parsons), Dan Albright’s Baton Rouge/Jackson ’63, Jason Halprin’s July 8th, 2016, and Lauren Moyer’s The Forcing, among others. Caroline Dijckmeester-Bins’ Black San Francisco spins off of James Baldwin’s Take This Hammer to follow up on 3 Hunter’s Point teens in that epochal ‘63 doc. ALSO contributions from Cauleen Smith, Ja’Tovia Gary, and Agnes Varda (Panther Newsreel)!

    Vancouver, British Columbia: Iris Film Collective
    6-9pm, 3434 Falaise Avenue
    BUNGALOW by Alex MacKenzie
    see Feb 13 for details

    Sunday, February 26, 2017
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    Vancouver, British Columbia: Iris Film Collective
    6-9pm, 3434 Falaise Avenue
    BUNGALOW by Alex MacKenzie
    see Feb 13 for details


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